Mugs

Mugs for sale at  Local Pottery  by CM,  Mills & Zoldak , and  Steve Murphy

Mugs for sale at Local Pottery by CM, Mills & Zoldak, and Steve Murphy

Mugs for sale at  Local Pottery  by  Tyler Gulden  and  Wayne Furest

Mugs for sale at Local Pottery by Tyler Gulden and Wayne Furest

Here are a whole bunch of mugs that I’ve drawn over the past few months. I originally started drawing these because I knew that if I drew some mugs I liked I would hone in on certain details that I might not pick up otherwise which would then allow me to incorporate those ideas into my pottery. When doing a drawing from life you’re constantly taking visual measurements, not in inches or centimeters, but in proportional relationships. So for example if I start a drawing with the oval shape of the opening of the mug and then I need to figure out how tall to make the mug, I’ll look at the actual mug I’m drawing and take a visual measurement figuring out if the oval is the same length as the height, or if the height is 1.5 times the size of the oval etc. The first few drawings I made were of mugs in the gallery at Local Pottery and then I put together a group of mugs pulled from my cabinet at home.

Top Row: First two are collaboration mugs made by myself,  Kaila Braley , and  Britt Tekla Drews  and third is from  Barking Spider Pottery Studio   Bottom Row: Mug made by myself, middle mug was made by W ater Dragon Pottery Studio from Halifax, Nova Scotia , and the third is one of mine.

Top Row: First two are collaboration mugs made by myself, Kaila Braley, and Britt Tekla Drews and third is from Barking Spider Pottery Studio

Bottom Row: Mug made by myself, middle mug was made by Water Dragon Pottery Studio from Halifax, Nova Scotia, and the third is one of mine.

First thing is first, try and fit everything onto the same page.

First thing is first, try and fit everything onto the same page.

Predictably Winston notices a nice flat space on my lap to sit on and nestles in. I then have to debate for a few minutes whether or not to kick him off.

Predictably Winston notices a nice flat space on my lap to sit on and nestles in. I then have to debate for a few minutes whether or not to kick him off.

Kicked Winston off my lap and now I'm going through and firming up all of the outlines and distances between the mugs. Also, I've let the last mug in the bottom row go. I realized in my beginning sketch that if I wanted to keep that mug in the composition I'd have to make everything smaller, but I liked the size I had going for the mugs so my choices became to either have one of the mugs running off the side of the page or eliminate it. I decided to eliminate it so that I would end up with a more solid overall composition.

Kicked Winston off my lap and now I'm going through and firming up all of the outlines and distances between the mugs. Also, I've let the last mug in the bottom row go. I realized in my beginning sketch that if I wanted to keep that mug in the composition I'd have to make everything smaller, but I liked the size I had going for the mugs so my choices became to either have one of the mugs running off the side of the page or eliminate it. I decided to eliminate it so that I would end up with a more solid overall composition.

Detail work comes in! From here I may still go back in and add the surroundings later but I ran out of time when I was making this. Adding in the surrounding area is something that should definitely be done at the time of the drawing, it should be developed equally along with the main subject, but that is the beauty of drawing in a sketchbook! This drawing is never going on a wall somewhere, it is just for me to enjoy and learn from. Sometimes I'll go back in years after a drawing was made and fill out the background with different colors or abstract type lines to finish off the composition in a way that is pleasing to me, but isn't trying to pretend like I still have the still-life in front of me, I'm just having fun and enjoying the design.

Detail work comes in! From here I may still go back in and add the surroundings later but I ran out of time when I was making this. Adding in the surrounding area is something that should definitely be done at the time of the drawing, it should be developed equally along with the main subject, but that is the beauty of drawing in a sketchbook! This drawing is never going on a wall somewhere, it is just for me to enjoy and learn from. Sometimes I'll go back in years after a drawing was made and fill out the background with different colors or abstract type lines to finish off the composition in a way that is pleasing to me, but isn't trying to pretend like I still have the still-life in front of me, I'm just having fun and enjoying the design.